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7 Things to Watch at Miami Dolphins Rookie Minicamp

Travis Wingfield

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Previewing Rookie Minicamp in Miami

Merry football season! Well, kind of…but not really. And that’s the first of many times you’ll hear me say that over the course of the next four months. Today marks the first mandatory attendance date on the calendar in Miami’s offseason program, even if more than half of the roster — including the overwhelming majority of the starters — are still on vacation.

Nearly a third of the Dolphins current 87-man roster will descend upon the training facility in Davie for a crash course in NFL professionalism. First-time Head Coach Brian Flores is making his rookie minicamp debut as well. For Flores, and the 21 rostered players (plus a handful of tryout players), it’s all about developing a routine and an expectation for how work will get done in this new era of Dolphins football.

The work expands beyond the football field. Class will be in session in the film room, nutrition will be a focal point, and the players will get familiarized with the weight room and everything the Nova Southeastern University facility has to offer.

We will hear from the coaches and players post-practice about the training sessions. These are the seven things we are looking forward to as the chinstraps are buckled and we get a taste of Miami’s 2019 rookie class.

1. Christian Wilkins Dominance from the Word Go

If you checked out our 360 episode on Wilkins, you heard the stories about the first time he showed up on his high school football team as a freshman. Wilkins made an all-league, team captain cry after a few reps.

That’s the aim for Wilkins from the moment Miami hits the practice field. His elite traits, most notably the quickness, should provide more than enough to put a hurting on Miami’s laundry list of undrafted free agent offensive linemen.

Wilkins enters camp, not only with a stranglehold on the distinction for best rookie, he could conceivably return to OTAs, with the veterans, as Miami’s best defensive lineman — and it all begins today.

2. The Quick Development of those UDFA Offensive Linemen

The good news, for the four undrafted free agents up front, is the opportunity each will get to face one of college football’s most dominant presences. If any of the four: Shaq Calhoun, Kirk Barron, Aaron Monteiro, or Ryan Anderson, can hold their own against the Clemson alum, it will serve as an opportunity to earn more reps during OTA’s later this month.

Miami’s interior offensive line positions are wide open, and with a glut of previously acquired developmental prospects treading water thus far in their NFL careers, this group of newcomers have to be excited about the opportunity.

3. Miami’s Offensive Line Draft Picks

Michael Deiter

Mandatory Credit: Brian Spurlock-USA TODAY Sports

Michael Deiter has been penciled into a starting position by every human proudly donning the aqua and orange. With 54 college starts, Deiter astonishingly became one of Miami’s most experienced lineman the moment he was selected in the third-round. The rookie is lauded for his fundamentals and technical refinement, and if Miami wants to avoid a disastrous season offensively, Deiter needs to stick — expeditiously.

Three rounds later, the Dolphins made Ohio State Tackle Isaiah Prince the latest developmental offensive line selection. Prince has the traits and build coaches will love, but his college tape suggests he has a long way to go before earning meaningful NFL reps. Dominating UDFA Defensive Linemen Dewayne Hendrix and Jonathan Ledbetter would be a good start for Prince.

4. The Reintroduction of the Fullback in Miami

Before the team can even assigned him a uniform number, Chandler Cox is already a fan favorite in Miami. The multi-purpose fullback is sprinkling nostalgia dust on Dolphins fans thinking back to the days of Lousaka Polite.

Cox, along with fellow seventh-round draft pick Myles Gaskin, should give this Miami class a lot of juice in 21-personnel packages.

5. Speed at Linebacker

Andrew Van Ginkel has an opportunity to carve out a sub-package role on the 2019 Dolphins defense. With only two of the linebacker positions vehemently spoken for (Raekwon McMillan and Jerome Baker), Van Ginkel’s mission to eat into Kiko Alonso’s snaps starts today.Van Ginkel excels in pass coverage and blitzing the quarterback, but it’s undrafted Miami native Terrill Hanks that provides the punch. Hanks, a hammer of a hitter, can scoot in his own right — when healthy; Hanks has been battling an ankle injury all spring — and he returns to his hometown with what he describes as a “mountain (replacing the proverbial chip) on his shoulder.”

6. Preston Williams Emerging as a Challenger to Devante Parker, Brice Butler

The Dolphins frontline receivers are all burners (Kenny Stills, Albert Wilson, Jakeem Grant). Devante Parker is here on a one-year, cheap, prove-it deal while Brice Butler is making only a fraction of Parker’s salary. Preston Williams is a similar build with potentially equal raw traits to the former first-round pick (Parker). The former five-star high school recruit has dealt with his fair share of off-the-field obstacles and, if he can straighten up, he has an opportunity to make Miami’s 53-man roster.

7. Josh Boyer’s Undrafted Free Agent Cornerback Conquest

Boyer, another Patriots defect, can lay claim to the development of both Malcom Butler and J.C. Jackson in New England. The pair of undrafted corners were instant success stories as rookies, and Boyer (Miami’s new Cornerbacks Coach) gets his hands on another trio of longshots (UTEP’s Nick Needham, Boise State’s Tyler Horton, and Northwestern’s Montre Hartage.)

It’s not quite the return of football, but any pigskin is welcomed this time of year. OTA’s begin at the end of this month and that’s the last real taste we have before training camp in Late-July.

Happy start of football season, ‘Phins fans. Kind of. But not really.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 17 at Seattle

Travis Wingfield

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Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

Week 17 at Seattle –

By the time this season finale came to an end the entire Cardinals operation had to breathe a sigh of relief. A disaster season, that came to a crashing conclusion, was finally in the rearview. For Josh Rosen, the last month of the season was a recurring nightmare. Rosen threw 146 passes in December and the only one that crossed pay dirt was a busted coverage in this Seattle game.

Some of Rosen’s strong suits didn’t travel to the Pacific Northwest. Throwing into contested windows, play-action passing, and third down conversions each brought back less than satisfactory returns.

The Cardinal passing offense converted 3-of-14 3rd downs. Rosen was 2-of-14 for 23 yards on contested throws and 5-of-10 for 56 yards on play pass.

Rosen was chucking-and-praying once again. The average air yards per throw tallied 10.8 yards, while the Arizona receivers only amassed 51 yards after the catch (34.2% of Rosen’s passing total).

The short passing game was far more fruitful than the vertical attacks.

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

The game was littered with mistakes from the Cardinals QB. Rosen registered 14 mistakes (11 from accuracy, 2 ball security issues, and 1 poor read). Rosen lost two fumbles and had two would-be interceptions dropped by the Seattle defense.

The personnel deployment featured more versatility than recent weeks. Rosen’s passes were supplemented by the following personnel packages.

 

11-personnel 31 snaps
12-personnel 3 snaps
21-personnel 4 snaps

 

As has been the case all season, Rosen was under frequent pressure. Seattle arrived for 11 pressures (6 sacks, 3 hits, 2 hurries) at an average time from snap-to-pressure of 2.19 seconds.

The busted coverage touchdown was Rosen’s one red-zone completion (1-of-3). He was in the gun for 25 snaps and under-center for 13.

Another week, another low conversion rate. The Cardinal passing game converted 8-of-38 plays into first downs (21.1%)

It’s difficult to imagine a more trying rookie season than the one Rosen experienced. The offensive line play was poor, the only consistent pass catcher was Larry Fitzgerald, and Rosen had his own share of rookie mistakes to compound things.

This game goes into the losing performance category marking eight consecutive games that Rosen failed to reach the winning performance category.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 7 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR, @SEA)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 16 vs. LA Rams

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 16 vs. LA Rams –

For the second consecutive game Josh Rosen didn’t finish under-center for the Cardinals. In a blowout loss, where it seemed like the entire game plan revolved around making life easy on Josh Rosen, Arizona still managed to get ran out of the building. Mike Glennon completed the final series for the Red Birds offense.

Rosen threw the ball only 23 times, but scrambled more than he has all season. The game plan also featured the least amount of variety, from a personnel grouping standpoint, all season.

 

11-personnel 30 snaps
12-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen’s typical third down heroics didn’t show up. The Cardinals converted only 2-of-10 third downs in the passing game (one a QB scramble). Converting, as it has been all season, was a challenge in general — Arizona converted just 6-of-31 drop backs (19.4%).

Rosen was in the shotgun almost exclusively (3 under-center, 28 in the gun). This led to a limited play-action passing game (only one throw from play pass).

The four mistakes attributed to Rosen were largely deep shots. He missed on short pass, but two of the three inaccuracies came on balls down the field. One of those deep shots was an ill-advised throw into coverage despite a wide open Larry Fitzgerald coming across the formation (seen in the video thread).

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

More than half of Rosen’s 87 passing yards came from YAC (54%). The average depth of Rosen’s passes was 9.22 air yards per throw.

Throwing into tight window was a futile effort. Rosen completed 1-of-7 contested throws for 7 yards. Pressure was a regular fixture, yet again, as Rosen was under duress on 11 drop backs (4 sacks, 5 hits, 2 hurries). The average time from snap-to-pressure was 2.30 seconds.

The war of attrition seems to have finally broken the Cardinals spirit. The team’s execution was lacking all year, but this game was something of a “white flag” effort from the coaching staff. Rosen gets tabbed with a losing performance for a lack of big-time plays, a few mistakes, and an awful holistic result.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 6 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 15 at Atlanta

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 15 at Atlanta –

We’ve reached the point in the season where the Cardinals coaching staff had to make a switch to prevent further damaging their 21-year-old quarterback. Josh Rosen, under duress all game, with very little help from the route concepts and plan to attack the Atlanta defense, was pulled for Mike Glennon in the fourth quarter.

The Falcons pass rush would’ve crippled the most grizzled veteran in the NFL; it completely debilitated Rosen. The Cardinal QB was under pressure 15-of-27 drop backs (6 sacks, 6 hits, 3 hurries) with an average snap-to-pressure time of 2.17 seconds.

Atlanta’s unrelenting pressure led to a season-low in average air yards per attempt (4.6 AYPT). The Arizona receivers picked up 82 yards after the catch counting for 62.1% of Rosen’s passing total.

Once again, a lopsided scoreboard forced Arizona into very little variety from a personnel grouping standpoint. Rosen was 4-of-5 with 37 yards on non-11-personnel calls. The issue there — Arizona was always in 11-personnell.

 

11-personnel 22 snaps
12-personnel 4 snaps
21-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen only committed two mistakes in the game (one accuracy, one a poor decision). The biggest mistake was an example of nervous antics in the pocket and a decision Rosen would prefer to have back (available in the Twitter thread).

Rosen was under-center just 5 times (gun 22), and only threw from play action three times; Rosen was 2-of-3 with 13 yards on play pass.

The Arizona offense converted only 18.5% (5-of-27) passing plays into first downs. Throwing into contested windows was a 50-50 proposition — Rosen threw for 68 yards on 4-of-8 passing into tight windows.

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 1/1 (100%)
11-19 yards 2/3 (66.7%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 12/15 (80%)

 

It was a miserable day for the Cardinals all the way around. Rosen never stood much of a chance to make a big time paly, or to make a game-changing mistake — but the one time he did make a crucial mistake, the game was already out of reach. This showing goes in the inconsequential column.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 5 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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