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Miami Dolphins

A Mid-Season Review: The Good, the Bad and the Ugly

Andrew Mitchell

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The Good

Wide Receiver

We knew going into camp that this position was one of our deeper position groups. To be fair we were all high on the group before the season but in some ways, I think they have surpassed the expectations. Kenny Stills’ production has taken a recent hit since Ryan Tannehill’s shoulder injury, but Albert Wilson was blowing up before injuring his hip. Those 2, plus Jakeem Grant and Danny Amendola has shown as a point of strength. If DeVante Parker could play like he did vs Houston every week then this could be our strongest group in years.

 

Off-season Moves

The front office triumvirate of Chris Grier, Mike Tannenbaum and Adam Gase have shown they can do it right, sometimes. The additions of Josh Sitton, Daniel Kilgore, Albert Wilson, Danny Amendola, Robert Quinn, and Frank Gore have all worked out nicely. Yes, half of them have been lost to injury but that doesn’t mean they were effective or building towards something positive when healthy.

The decision to replace Landry with Wilson was met with skepticism but I think the contract value has proven that point moot. Not to mention they also added Tight End Nick O’Leary about 2-3 weeks ago and he has been sensational as the Dolphins starting tight end used mostly in a blocking role.

 

Still in the Hunt

Yes, the Miami Dolphins started 3-0, yes, they got our hopes up. We are back to reality after a myriad of key injuries and sit at 4-4. They currently sit 2nd in the division, 2 games behind the New England Patriots and 1 game in front of the Jets whom they play next. They are 8th in the AFC standings vying for a spot in the top 6 in hopes of a wildcard spot. While it isn’t impossible, with games coming up against Green Bay, Minnesota and Jacksonville; 9-7 may be best case scenario.

 

The Bad

Play-calling

Ugly, predictable, frustrating and perplexing are words I would use to sum up Adam Gase’s play-calling this season as a whole. There’s been some bright spots, but for a sum of parts it has not been good. Not for someone who’s been dubbed as an “offensive genius” and “quarterback whisperer.” The Dolphins have yet to score a Touchdown on their opening drive at all this season, which should be the easiest to score because it’s fully scripted and hasn’t been influenced by the flow of the game. While Gase has shown he makes great adjustments throughout the game, he needs to remember to stick to what’s working. His play-calling in my opinion was why we lost the game vs the Bengals. Too many times he abandons the run too early and some of his play calls on 3rd and 4th and short have been questionable at best.

 

TJ McDonald

Okay, so this could just be me but…TJ has been pretty terrible all season. He does not look like the player he was for the Rams. A lot of this off-season there was talk on our site and in the Dolphins hierarchy to move him to linebacker, I am not sure that’s even viable anymore. I have seen so many big plays this season come at the hands of McDonald. Whether it’s a blown coverage, lack of speed, bad angles or just whiffing on tackles. In my opinion he isn’t fast enough to be in the secondary and he doesn’t tackle well enough for me to even feel great about him at linebacker. Luckily, we hit a home run by drafting Minkah Fitzpatrick, who no doubt should be lined up next to Reshad Jones at safety next season.

 

Cordrea Tankersley

Man, this is so perplexing, and nobody has answers. Last season Tank ended up starting 11 games for us as rookie and he played admirably. So much to the point that we figured we had a solid starter alongside Xavien Howard to play on the boundary while Bobby McCain held down the nickel slot corner position. For whatever reason, Tank hasn’t sniffed the field much at all and has lost playing time to 2017 undrafted rookie Torry McTyer. This hurts the team when a player falls off like this. If Tank was playing like he did last season we would have more options at corner which also would kick Bobby McCain back inside to slot corner and possibly allow Minkah to replace McDonald at safety. Hopefully he can rebound towards the end of this season or start fresh next off-season.

 

The Ugly

Injuries

The injury bug must be warm blooded because it seems to love South Florida lately. By week 3 we were already down 2 starters on a revamped offensive line. Then we lost Will Hayes, our most versatile defensive lineman for the season. For the last 3 weeks of the season we have had Brock Osweiler at Quarterback since Ryan Tannehill hurt his shoulder and most recently, we lost Albert Wilson for the season with a hip injury.  At the halfway mark of the season we are down 5 starters for the season. Not to mention the handful of games missed by key players such as Kenny Stills, Bobby McCain, Cam Wake and Laremy Tunsil.

 

DeVante Parker

This got slotted into the “Ugly” section due to his most recent performance vs Houston. Not because I think he can consistently play like that but because it did prove that he does possess the ability to be a game changer at the wide receiver position. Factor in his size, which no other receivers have on this roster and you have a possible monster at the position. Problem is he’s been inactive over injuries many thought he could still suit up with so then begged the question was it Adam Gase?

Then came comments from his agent as Parker’s name was thrown into some trade rumors and now you have a recipe for an ugly situation. With the injuries mounting, it will be telling if the organization decides to bank on DvP’s recent performance and get a good draft pick (3rd or 4th round) or do they put him in the fire and have him prove himself? Time will tell.

 

Defense

The defense has new starters in many positions and it has shown. Lately, defensive coordinator, Matt Burke, has had his job being questioned as many guys continue to blow coverages and lineup incorrectly. All in all, the defense has not been good. Robert Quinn and am Wake are not applying the pressure we though they would. The interior defensive line, after losing Suh, has shown it is a weak point as well despite Vincent Taylor playing well and making Jordan Phillips expendable.

The linebackers cannot cover anyone it seems, Raekwon McMillan more than most. He has been somewhat of a letdown, I would dare say that rookie Jerome Baker has played just as well if not slightly better. Add in the secondary issues at boundary corner opposite of Howard and TJ McDonald’s constant mistakes and it has been, Ugly. There’s a lot of talent and potential, eventually Matt Burke needs to get it together or else his services will no longer be needed.

 

Andrew is a lifelong Dolphins’ fan that has a deep passion for sports. He has a Multimedia Journalism Degree from Florida Atlantic University and also has interned for ESPN Radio. For all his opinions and articles you can follow him on Twitter: @mitchpr0

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 17 at Seattle

Travis Wingfield

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Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

Week 17 at Seattle –

By the time this season finale came to an end the entire Cardinals operation had to breathe a sigh of relief. A disaster season, that came to a crashing conclusion, was finally in the rearview. For Josh Rosen, the last month of the season was a recurring nightmare. Rosen threw 146 passes in December and the only one that crossed pay dirt was a busted coverage in this Seattle game.

Some of Rosen’s strong suits didn’t travel to the Pacific Northwest. Throwing into contested windows, play-action passing, and third down conversions each brought back less than satisfactory returns.

The Cardinal passing offense converted 3-of-14 3rd downs. Rosen was 2-of-14 for 23 yards on contested throws and 5-of-10 for 56 yards on play pass.

Rosen was chucking-and-praying once again. The average air yards per throw tallied 10.8 yards, while the Arizona receivers only amassed 51 yards after the catch (34.2% of Rosen’s passing total).

The short passing game was far more fruitful than the vertical attacks.

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

The game was littered with mistakes from the Cardinals QB. Rosen registered 14 mistakes (11 from accuracy, 2 ball security issues, and 1 poor read). Rosen lost two fumbles and had two would-be interceptions dropped by the Seattle defense.

The personnel deployment featured more versatility than recent weeks. Rosen’s passes were supplemented by the following personnel packages.

 

11-personnel 31 snaps
12-personnel 3 snaps
21-personnel 4 snaps

 

As has been the case all season, Rosen was under frequent pressure. Seattle arrived for 11 pressures (6 sacks, 3 hits, 2 hurries) at an average time from snap-to-pressure of 2.19 seconds.

The busted coverage touchdown was Rosen’s one red-zone completion (1-of-3). He was in the gun for 25 snaps and under-center for 13.

Another week, another low conversion rate. The Cardinal passing game converted 8-of-38 plays into first downs (21.1%)

It’s difficult to imagine a more trying rookie season than the one Rosen experienced. The offensive line play was poor, the only consistent pass catcher was Larry Fitzgerald, and Rosen had his own share of rookie mistakes to compound things.

This game goes into the losing performance category marking eight consecutive games that Rosen failed to reach the winning performance category.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 7 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR, @SEA)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 16 vs. LA Rams

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 16 vs. LA Rams –

For the second consecutive game Josh Rosen didn’t finish under-center for the Cardinals. In a blowout loss, where it seemed like the entire game plan revolved around making life easy on Josh Rosen, Arizona still managed to get ran out of the building. Mike Glennon completed the final series for the Red Birds offense.

Rosen threw the ball only 23 times, but scrambled more than he has all season. The game plan also featured the least amount of variety, from a personnel grouping standpoint, all season.

 

11-personnel 30 snaps
12-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen’s typical third down heroics didn’t show up. The Cardinals converted only 2-of-10 third downs in the passing game (one a QB scramble). Converting, as it has been all season, was a challenge in general — Arizona converted just 6-of-31 drop backs (19.4%).

Rosen was in the shotgun almost exclusively (3 under-center, 28 in the gun). This led to a limited play-action passing game (only one throw from play pass).

The four mistakes attributed to Rosen were largely deep shots. He missed on short pass, but two of the three inaccuracies came on balls down the field. One of those deep shots was an ill-advised throw into coverage despite a wide open Larry Fitzgerald coming across the formation (seen in the video thread).

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

More than half of Rosen’s 87 passing yards came from YAC (54%). The average depth of Rosen’s passes was 9.22 air yards per throw.

Throwing into tight window was a futile effort. Rosen completed 1-of-7 contested throws for 7 yards. Pressure was a regular fixture, yet again, as Rosen was under duress on 11 drop backs (4 sacks, 5 hits, 2 hurries). The average time from snap-to-pressure was 2.30 seconds.

The war of attrition seems to have finally broken the Cardinals spirit. The team’s execution was lacking all year, but this game was something of a “white flag” effort from the coaching staff. Rosen gets tabbed with a losing performance for a lack of big-time plays, a few mistakes, and an awful holistic result.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 6 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 15 at Atlanta

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 15 at Atlanta –

We’ve reached the point in the season where the Cardinals coaching staff had to make a switch to prevent further damaging their 21-year-old quarterback. Josh Rosen, under duress all game, with very little help from the route concepts and plan to attack the Atlanta defense, was pulled for Mike Glennon in the fourth quarter.

The Falcons pass rush would’ve crippled the most grizzled veteran in the NFL; it completely debilitated Rosen. The Cardinal QB was under pressure 15-of-27 drop backs (6 sacks, 6 hits, 3 hurries) with an average snap-to-pressure time of 2.17 seconds.

Atlanta’s unrelenting pressure led to a season-low in average air yards per attempt (4.6 AYPT). The Arizona receivers picked up 82 yards after the catch counting for 62.1% of Rosen’s passing total.

Once again, a lopsided scoreboard forced Arizona into very little variety from a personnel grouping standpoint. Rosen was 4-of-5 with 37 yards on non-11-personnel calls. The issue there — Arizona was always in 11-personnell.

 

11-personnel 22 snaps
12-personnel 4 snaps
21-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen only committed two mistakes in the game (one accuracy, one a poor decision). The biggest mistake was an example of nervous antics in the pocket and a decision Rosen would prefer to have back (available in the Twitter thread).

Rosen was under-center just 5 times (gun 22), and only threw from play action three times; Rosen was 2-of-3 with 13 yards on play pass.

The Arizona offense converted only 18.5% (5-of-27) passing plays into first downs. Throwing into contested windows was a 50-50 proposition — Rosen threw for 68 yards on 4-of-8 passing into tight windows.

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 1/1 (100%)
11-19 yards 2/3 (66.7%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 12/15 (80%)

 

It was a miserable day for the Cardinals all the way around. Rosen never stood much of a chance to make a big time paly, or to make a game-changing mistake — but the one time he did make a crucial mistake, the game was already out of reach. This showing goes in the inconsequential column.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 5 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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