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Miami Dolphins

Chris Grier Updates Status of Miami Dolphins – 4/17/19

Jason Hrina

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Image Credit: Miami Dolphins / Jason Hrina

With the first set of “voluntary” workouts underway down in Miami, we were able to get our first look at most of the players currently on the roster.

23 roster spots remain vacant at the moment, which means Chris Grier and the rest of his Miami Dolphins staff has a lot of work to do before training camp hits in a few months.

While these workouts are expected to be lighthearted, easy, and more of a way for players to remain in shape (*side-eyes Ryan Fitzpatrick*) and for coaches to catch up with their players, it’s an opportunity for the fans to connect with a team they’ve heard little from since January.

Earlier this afternoon, General Manager Chris Grier met with the media and had a few things to say about the upcoming NFL draft:

On His Accountability:

One question that has been heavily debated this offseason is whether or not Chris Grier had final say as the General Manager of the Miami Dolphins. Most fans figured Mike Tannenbaum was the man in charge, only to be overruled by Adam Gase‘s ego. But Grier confirmed that ‘General Manager’ was more than just a title:

Did Grier have final say in the roster moves during his initial stint as General Manager?

“Yes”

“It was a collaboration. I’m not going to force a coach to take a player…it creates that animosity and mistrust. I’m not going to force any player on anyone, but yes, I had final say.”

Would this year be any different with a new coaching staff aboard?:

“No”

“I’m very collaborative, that’s the way I work”

“It’s a combination of scouts and personal working together, having the same vision”

(Given Tannenbaum’s departure and the new power structure in place) Is this draft more important to him?:

“(The) pressure is self-imposed; I want every draft to be great. I would like every pick to work. It’s going to happen, you’re going to miss on guys”

On Selecting a Quarterback:

How would you evaluate the quarterback class this year?

“I think this class is a good class of QBs”

“Like all of them, this class has players that haven’t started as many games as you’d like to see…it’s a bit more projection”

“(The starts are) important because it helps paint the picture. These kids nowadays are playing 7-on-7 football. They’ve been doing all these camps, working with all these QB gurus since high school.” (Grier is implying that quarterbacks are much more experienced even without starting college games) “it shouldn’t rule you out from picking somebody”

Is it safe to say the team is going to select at least 1 QB in this year’s draft?:

“We’d like to upgrade all positions…make everyone better”

“We’re not going to reach for one. We’re not going to pick one because it’s a “need”. If you’re selecting a QB instead of a starting tackle in the 3rd-round, you’re hurting your franchise”

“50% or less (of the quarterbacks drafted) end up becoming ‘good’ starting QBs” I think he’s implying that quarterbacks selected in the 1st-round are 50/50.

“Overall, I’d say it’s a good QB class”

One of the more eye-opening quotes of the presser was:

“We didn’t spend a lot of time with a lot of those guys last year”

Grier was referring to the quarterbacks that were selected in the 2018 NFL draft (Baker Mayfield, Sam Darnold, Josh Allen, Josh Rosen and Lamar Jackson). For a team that had relied on Jay Cutler, Matt Moore and an injured Ryan Tannehill, it makes me wonder why the team didn’t spend more time researching the most prominent position on your roster.

We know Miami met with and worked out these quarterbacks last season, so it’s inaccurate to say the Dolphins didn’t do their due diligence, but what exactly is Grier trying to say when he mentions this? Is it merely an excuse to explain why a position they thought they were content at (a healthy Ryan Tannehill) ended up costing them the playoffs?

On the Kind of Player he Wants at #13:

“Tough. Competitive. Passion for football. Smart. Going to do things the right way”

“If you miss, you want to take someone that gives you the smallest margin of error in case you do miss”

Does lack of maturity turn you off?:

“It’s a little bit of a concern, but the guy is 21 years-old. There have been a lot of good players in this league that have had these issues that might not have been drafted because of that but turned out to be great.”

“You’ll have some 21 year-old kids who have ‘been coddled’ a little bit. Now they’re going into a man’s world where you’ll have to block men. You’ll have to do things the right way. You can’t take plays off.”

“There are so many factors when dealing with human beings”

When picking at #13, do you have a pool of guys you conjure up and pick from there?:

“Stack your board for how you like it. (At the) end of the day, it doesn’t matter where you pick. Have to decide where you’re grading for your team. View how the players fit your system.”

On Trading Up or Down in the Draft:

“It’s wide open. Whatever helps us as an organization.”

“Should always have a handful of guys you definitely take no matter where. If they’re there, these are the guys we’re taking”

“As (the draft) moves down and get closer (to your pick), you say ‘alright, we can move back and get one of these guys for sure and create more picks for later in the draft'”

“Some of the moves we’ve made this offseason have given us the ability to (trade up) if need be”

“It’s always tough…last year we didn’t expect Minkah (Fitzpatrick) to be there at #11. Once that happens, you start to see how it falls after the first 7 or 8 picks…”

“As you get closer to our pick, (and) there are guys we like, we might trade back”

Continuing with the pattern this offseason is creating, most of us expect the Miami Dolphins to utilize their 2019 draft picks to acquire more picks in 2020. It’s more likely that the team trades down than trades up, but this doesn’t mean that all of their 2020 ammunition is for a franchise quarterback. Mid-round trades happen annually, so expect to see Miami entertain the idea of trading up if there is a specific player they deem essential.

Communication with other teams in advance about their willingness to trade:

“Started way back at the owner’s meetings”

“(It will) start to pick up next Monday or Tuesday”

On Various Position Groups:

Do you weigh the strength of each position group when deciding which player to select?:

“You never want to bank on saying “I’m going to get this guy in the 2nd-round” because it inevitably comes back where you miss”

“You go through your process and stack it the way you feel. There’s this nose tackle versus a wide receiver and we weigh how it affects the roster (overall)”

Strong position groups in the draft:

“Wide receiver is deeper than people think. You can get good value picks for the first 3 rounds there.”

“It’s a good offensive line class as well. A lot of potential….some players that have to mature a little more”

Defensive line is very talented this draft:

“Off the top of my head, there are probably 5 (elite defensive linemen). After that, there are a lot of good players”

Will he select one of them?:

“It’s scheme-specific”

Expect the Dolphins to heavily invest in their offensive and defensive line. While other areas like cornerback, wide receiver and linebacker may be considered “needs”, there are glaring holes in the trenches that need to be addressed before those other positions.

Is Grier certain the team will be selecting offensive line help in the first 3 rounds of the draft?:

“We feel good about it…but it’s out of our control after #13”

How many starters would Grier like to get out of this draft:

“Would love to have 7 starters….we know for everyone that’s not realistic. If we can get 3 starters and the rest back up depth we would be happy with that.”

On Reshad Jones:

“He doesn’t want a trade. At least he hasn’t informed me…”

“I’ve known Reshad (Jones) the longest of anyone here….spent a lot of time trying to get to know him (leading up to his draft back in 2010)”

“We’d love to have him here (at voluntary workouts), but he’s earned the right (to not be here)”

Reshad Jones is costing $17.16m against the cap in 2019, and is set to cost $15.63m against the cap in 2020 and $14.55m against the cap in 2021. Although Jones is a legend in Miami, his best days are most likely behind him and his attitude isn’t worth investing in. If the Dolphins are able to get anything for Jones, they should take advantage of removing his salary, even if the team needs to give up a low-round pick in the deal to facilitate the trade (Brock Osweiler to the Cleveland Browns style).

On Charles Harris:

“They’re excited to work with Charles (Harris). They liked him previously when they worked with him out of college….(we’re) excited for his future”

“When you change coaches or culture you will always have misfit pieces” OUCH!!!

To be fair, Grier didn’t make his “misfit pieces” comments directly at Harris – he was referring to fitting players into different schemes after a coaching change. But let’s not dismiss the fact that Harris is one of the only players on the roster without a position. Other than Minkah Fitzpatrick being so dominant everywhere he plays that the team doesn’t know where to fit him, who else is a misfit on this team? You don’t need to read too deeply between the lines to see who he might inadvertently be referring to.

Growing up a passionate Dolphins fan in Jets territory, Jason learned from an early age that life as a Dolphins fan wasn’t going to be easy. Previously the Sports Editor for his university newspaper, Jason has experience writing columns, creating game recaps and conducting interviews with Hall of Fame athletes (Harry Carson and Yogi Berra are two of his proudest interviews). When he’s not dissecting the latest sports news, you can find him perplexed over the Dolphins offensive line woes or involuntarily introducing music to his neighbors.

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 17 at Seattle

Travis Wingfield

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Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

Week 17 at Seattle –

By the time this season finale came to an end the entire Cardinals operation had to breathe a sigh of relief. A disaster season, that came to a crashing conclusion, was finally in the rearview. For Josh Rosen, the last month of the season was a recurring nightmare. Rosen threw 146 passes in December and the only one that crossed pay dirt was a busted coverage in this Seattle game.

Some of Rosen’s strong suits didn’t travel to the Pacific Northwest. Throwing into contested windows, play-action passing, and third down conversions each brought back less than satisfactory returns.

The Cardinal passing offense converted 3-of-14 3rd downs. Rosen was 2-of-14 for 23 yards on contested throws and 5-of-10 for 56 yards on play pass.

Rosen was chucking-and-praying once again. The average air yards per throw tallied 10.8 yards, while the Arizona receivers only amassed 51 yards after the catch (34.2% of Rosen’s passing total).

The short passing game was far more fruitful than the vertical attacks.

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

The game was littered with mistakes from the Cardinals QB. Rosen registered 14 mistakes (11 from accuracy, 2 ball security issues, and 1 poor read). Rosen lost two fumbles and had two would-be interceptions dropped by the Seattle defense.

The personnel deployment featured more versatility than recent weeks. Rosen’s passes were supplemented by the following personnel packages.

 

11-personnel 31 snaps
12-personnel 3 snaps
21-personnel 4 snaps

 

As has been the case all season, Rosen was under frequent pressure. Seattle arrived for 11 pressures (6 sacks, 3 hits, 2 hurries) at an average time from snap-to-pressure of 2.19 seconds.

The busted coverage touchdown was Rosen’s one red-zone completion (1-of-3). He was in the gun for 25 snaps and under-center for 13.

Another week, another low conversion rate. The Cardinal passing game converted 8-of-38 plays into first downs (21.1%)

It’s difficult to imagine a more trying rookie season than the one Rosen experienced. The offensive line play was poor, the only consistent pass catcher was Larry Fitzgerald, and Rosen had his own share of rookie mistakes to compound things.

This game goes into the losing performance category marking eight consecutive games that Rosen failed to reach the winning performance category.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 7 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR, @SEA)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 16 vs. LA Rams

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 16 vs. LA Rams –

For the second consecutive game Josh Rosen didn’t finish under-center for the Cardinals. In a blowout loss, where it seemed like the entire game plan revolved around making life easy on Josh Rosen, Arizona still managed to get ran out of the building. Mike Glennon completed the final series for the Red Birds offense.

Rosen threw the ball only 23 times, but scrambled more than he has all season. The game plan also featured the least amount of variety, from a personnel grouping standpoint, all season.

 

11-personnel 30 snaps
12-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen’s typical third down heroics didn’t show up. The Cardinals converted only 2-of-10 third downs in the passing game (one a QB scramble). Converting, as it has been all season, was a challenge in general — Arizona converted just 6-of-31 drop backs (19.4%).

Rosen was in the shotgun almost exclusively (3 under-center, 28 in the gun). This led to a limited play-action passing game (only one throw from play pass).

The four mistakes attributed to Rosen were largely deep shots. He missed on short pass, but two of the three inaccuracies came on balls down the field. One of those deep shots was an ill-advised throw into coverage despite a wide open Larry Fitzgerald coming across the formation (seen in the video thread).

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

More than half of Rosen’s 87 passing yards came from YAC (54%). The average depth of Rosen’s passes was 9.22 air yards per throw.

Throwing into tight window was a futile effort. Rosen completed 1-of-7 contested throws for 7 yards. Pressure was a regular fixture, yet again, as Rosen was under duress on 11 drop backs (4 sacks, 5 hits, 2 hurries). The average time from snap-to-pressure was 2.30 seconds.

The war of attrition seems to have finally broken the Cardinals spirit. The team’s execution was lacking all year, but this game was something of a “white flag” effort from the coaching staff. Rosen gets tabbed with a losing performance for a lack of big-time plays, a few mistakes, and an awful holistic result.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 6 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 15 at Atlanta

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 15 at Atlanta –

We’ve reached the point in the season where the Cardinals coaching staff had to make a switch to prevent further damaging their 21-year-old quarterback. Josh Rosen, under duress all game, with very little help from the route concepts and plan to attack the Atlanta defense, was pulled for Mike Glennon in the fourth quarter.

The Falcons pass rush would’ve crippled the most grizzled veteran in the NFL; it completely debilitated Rosen. The Cardinal QB was under pressure 15-of-27 drop backs (6 sacks, 6 hits, 3 hurries) with an average snap-to-pressure time of 2.17 seconds.

Atlanta’s unrelenting pressure led to a season-low in average air yards per attempt (4.6 AYPT). The Arizona receivers picked up 82 yards after the catch counting for 62.1% of Rosen’s passing total.

Once again, a lopsided scoreboard forced Arizona into very little variety from a personnel grouping standpoint. Rosen was 4-of-5 with 37 yards on non-11-personnel calls. The issue there — Arizona was always in 11-personnell.

 

11-personnel 22 snaps
12-personnel 4 snaps
21-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen only committed two mistakes in the game (one accuracy, one a poor decision). The biggest mistake was an example of nervous antics in the pocket and a decision Rosen would prefer to have back (available in the Twitter thread).

Rosen was under-center just 5 times (gun 22), and only threw from play action three times; Rosen was 2-of-3 with 13 yards on play pass.

The Arizona offense converted only 18.5% (5-of-27) passing plays into first downs. Throwing into contested windows was a 50-50 proposition — Rosen threw for 68 yards on 4-of-8 passing into tight windows.

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 1/1 (100%)
11-19 yards 2/3 (66.7%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 12/15 (80%)

 

It was a miserable day for the Cardinals all the way around. Rosen never stood much of a chance to make a big time paly, or to make a game-changing mistake — but the one time he did make a crucial mistake, the game was already out of reach. This showing goes in the inconsequential column.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 5 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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