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Miami Dolphins

Miami Dolphins 2019 Undrafted Free Agent Class

Travis Wingfield

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Though no official announcement on the 16 undrafted free agents rumored to join Miami has been made, the validity of the class is ironclad. The Dolphins, Wednesday, announced the release of three players (Luke Falk, Dee Delaney, Jeremiah Valoaga) — bringing the roster-number to 87 — three below the 90-man maximum.

The portion of free agency that doesn’t impact the compensatory draft pick formula is right around the corner (begins Tuesday), meaning the Dolphins will likely go the route of veterans to fill out the roster vacancies to compete with the newly acquired rookies.

On Sunday, our Staff Writer Gabe Hauari predicted which of the 16 UDFAs has the best shot to make the opening day roster. In this piece, we will cover each of those 16 players with a snapshot at their strengths, weaknesses, and a clip (or two) to showcase their skills.

LB Terrill Hanks, New Mexico State

Snapshot: Hanks was all over the pre-draft map, but ultimately went undrafted because of poor testing metrics. Hanks, whose tape showcased a sideline-to-sideline burner, worked out at the combine despite a bad ankle injury. The Miami native ran a disappointing 4.98 40-time, but jumped 35.5 inches, and 118 inches on the vertical and broad respectively.

Hanks turned heads at the Senior Bowl garnering Darius Leonard and Fred Warner comparisons. His speed is matched by his tenacity, aggression, and ball skills (eight career interceptions). Hanks could stand to clean up his grabby habits in coverage, and lack of control when arriving to the ball carrier.

LB Tre Watson, Maryland

Snapshot: The first-team All-Big Ten ‘backer carries a chip on his shoulder. Watson’s pro-day 4.73-second forty-time pairs well with his sound tackling technique and fundamentals. Like Hanks, Watson arrives with force, but has a penchant for misdiagnosing and missing his run-fits.

Watson has a shot to be a perfect match in this odd-front defense. He will compete for a job occupied by Chase Allen and/or Mike Hull.

WR Preston Williams, Colorado State

Snapshot: A shaky college career dropped this former five-star recruit out of the draft altogether, but the physical tools are eye-popping. Williams needs refinement in his releases and at the top of the route, but he’s a physical specimen that ran fast enough (4.51) for his size and strength profile.

Williams can compete with Devante Parker and Brice Butler for work at the X position, but his most likely route is to progress through the practice squad and try again in 2020.

WR Trenton Irwin, Stanford

Snapshot: Irwin defines reliability at the position. Catching 77.5% of passes targeted his way, Irwin has soft hands with the frame to help shield off defenders while making contested catches. A former five-start high school recruit, Irwin needs work cleaning up his routes — primarily through footwork — and had almost no touchdown production.

DE Jonathan Ledbetter, Georgia

Snapshot: If the Dolphins were hoping to conceal their preferred prototypes, the cat is officially out of the bag. Ledbetter is one of many monsters acquired by Miami over the draft weekend. At 6-4, 280 pounds, with 34.5-inch arms, Ledbetter has the ideal build to batten down a five-tech job on Miami’s defense.

Ledbetter isn’t going to win with explosiveness or change of direction, but he can play with balance, power, and heavy hands — a preferred trait in Patrick Graham’s defense.

DE Dewayne Hendrix, Pittsburgh

Snapshot: Hendrix has the length and explosiveness to develop into an edge rusher in the NFL — though it never materialized for him at the collegiate level. His get-off allows him to force the tackle into an early set, which allows him to use his change-of-direction to dip, or bend, en route to the quarterback.

Hendrix might need to learn to stand-up in the new Dolphins defense.

CB Nick Needham, UTEP

Snapshot: Needham has the footwork and competitive toughness to develop into a quality NFL cornerback. He excels mirroring in man-coverage as his hands and feet work in unison to consistently force the wide out to throw extra steps into the route.

Needham showed a penchant for excelling across all coverage schemes at UTEP, and more than held his own against power-five competition (Tennessee). Any tape you turn on of Needham’s you’ll instantly notice the footwork.

Check out this in-depth breakdown of Needham’s game.

CB Montre Hartage, Northwestern

Snapshot: Hartage’s 4.68 forty-yard-dash would normally take him off Miami’s watch list, but the other metrics brought the Phins back in. Ridiculous numbers in the vert (34.5 inch), broad (123 inch), three-cone (6.95 seconds), and short-shuttle (4.08 seconds) puts Hartage right in Coach Flores’ wheelhouse — just the same the impressive ball skills. With nine career picks, noticeable tracking skills, and instinctive nature, Hartage has the makeup of a player that would jive with Miami’s vision at the position.

It’s the lack of long-speed, and stiffness in his hips, that could keep Hartage from realizing the NFL dream.

CB Tyler Horton, Boise State

Snapshot: Horton will need to dramatically improve his functional strength and compete at the next level. Everything else checks the box, however, as he can run, get into phase, and play the football with any corner in the country.

OL Ryan Anderson, Wake Forest

Snapshot: A zig to the rest of Miami’s rookie zagging, Anderson doesn’t have the power as most of his fellow rookie OL comrades. He struggles with pad level dropping the anchor against bull rushes, and isn’t the most athletic lineman either.

OG Shaq Calhoun, Mississippi State

Snapshot: Shaq Calhoun is built from granite with the playing style to match. He’s a mauler with a punishing mindset and the thick upper body to generate some serious power. Calhoun isn’t an elite athlete, but he’s adequate in that department. He’s a try-hard player with a high-motor that finishes blocks — a rarity in today’s college game.

If Calhoun can get the technique to catch up (hand placement) and add to his football aptitude repertoire (picking up games from the DL), he can stick on the Dolphins roster.

OL Aaron Monteiro, Boston College

Snapshot: A heady player from Brian Flores’ alma matter, Monteiro is already sharp with the technical aspects of the game. He quickly gets into his pass sets, but needs to improve his functional athleticism, contact balance, and weight transferring.

OC Kirk Barron, Purdue

Snapshot: There’s a YouTube video of Barron’s best reps at Purdue; inside you’ll find the three-year starter fulfilling a variety of roles for the Boilermaker offense. Gap scheme drive blocking, pulling play side, outside zone reaching the three-tech, getting downfield in the screen game, he was the unquestioned lynchpin of the Purdue offense.

His athleticism will be tested at the next level, and he could stand to improve getting too high out of his stance, but he’s got a shot to compete for a roster spot.

FS Rob Rolle, Villanova

Snapshot: The only safety added to the roster this entire offseason, Rolle has a chance to crack the roster simply based on the numbers game. He has the size, range, and instincts to test for a MOF safety role, though his top-end speed and tackling technique are rather wanting.

P Stone Wilson, FIU

Snapshot: I have no idea how to evaluate punters. I can tell you that Stone Wilson averaged 44 yards-per-punt last year at FIU.

LS Les Farnsworth, Nevada

Snapshot: See the Wilson snapshot for my feelings on evaluating long snappers. I don’t remember the last snap that John Denney flubbed. Tough place to come and try to win LS job.

It should come as no surprise if multiple players from this crop make the opening day roster. The four coaches that came south from New England saw Bill Belichick keep UDFAs on the roster literally every year — some of which turned into pro-bowlers.

The second half of Miami’s 2019 preseason games are going to be an evaluator’s dream.

@WingfieldNFL

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  1. Avatar

    Rich McQuillen

    May 3, 2019 at 7:43 pm

    Outstanding Article! The only thing i noticed that looked a little funny to me. On FS Rob Rolle, he runs a 4.43 40(draftscout.com), so I’m not sure why his top end speed would be wanting.

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 17 at Seattle

Travis Wingfield

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Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

Week 17 at Seattle –

By the time this season finale came to an end the entire Cardinals operation had to breathe a sigh of relief. A disaster season, that came to a crashing conclusion, was finally in the rearview. For Josh Rosen, the last month of the season was a recurring nightmare. Rosen threw 146 passes in December and the only one that crossed pay dirt was a busted coverage in this Seattle game.

Some of Rosen’s strong suits didn’t travel to the Pacific Northwest. Throwing into contested windows, play-action passing, and third down conversions each brought back less than satisfactory returns.

The Cardinal passing offense converted 3-of-14 3rd downs. Rosen was 2-of-14 for 23 yards on contested throws and 5-of-10 for 56 yards on play pass.

Rosen was chucking-and-praying once again. The average air yards per throw tallied 10.8 yards, while the Arizona receivers only amassed 51 yards after the catch (34.2% of Rosen’s passing total).

The short passing game was far more fruitful than the vertical attacks.

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

The game was littered with mistakes from the Cardinals QB. Rosen registered 14 mistakes (11 from accuracy, 2 ball security issues, and 1 poor read). Rosen lost two fumbles and had two would-be interceptions dropped by the Seattle defense.

The personnel deployment featured more versatility than recent weeks. Rosen’s passes were supplemented by the following personnel packages.

 

11-personnel 31 snaps
12-personnel 3 snaps
21-personnel 4 snaps

 

As has been the case all season, Rosen was under frequent pressure. Seattle arrived for 11 pressures (6 sacks, 3 hits, 2 hurries) at an average time from snap-to-pressure of 2.19 seconds.

The busted coverage touchdown was Rosen’s one red-zone completion (1-of-3). He was in the gun for 25 snaps and under-center for 13.

Another week, another low conversion rate. The Cardinal passing game converted 8-of-38 plays into first downs (21.1%)

It’s difficult to imagine a more trying rookie season than the one Rosen experienced. The offensive line play was poor, the only consistent pass catcher was Larry Fitzgerald, and Rosen had his own share of rookie mistakes to compound things.

This game goes into the losing performance category marking eight consecutive games that Rosen failed to reach the winning performance category.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 7 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR, @SEA)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 16 vs. LA Rams

Travis Wingfield

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Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 16 vs. LA Rams –

For the second consecutive game Josh Rosen didn’t finish under-center for the Cardinals. In a blowout loss, where it seemed like the entire game plan revolved around making life easy on Josh Rosen, Arizona still managed to get ran out of the building. Mike Glennon completed the final series for the Red Birds offense.

Rosen threw the ball only 23 times, but scrambled more than he has all season. The game plan also featured the least amount of variety, from a personnel grouping standpoint, all season.

 

11-personnel 30 snaps
12-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen’s typical third down heroics didn’t show up. The Cardinals converted only 2-of-10 third downs in the passing game (one a QB scramble). Converting, as it has been all season, was a challenge in general — Arizona converted just 6-of-31 drop backs (19.4%).

Rosen was in the shotgun almost exclusively (3 under-center, 28 in the gun). This led to a limited play-action passing game (only one throw from play pass).

The four mistakes attributed to Rosen were largely deep shots. He missed on short pass, but two of the three inaccuracies came on balls down the field. One of those deep shots was an ill-advised throw into coverage despite a wide open Larry Fitzgerald coming across the formation (seen in the video thread).

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

More than half of Rosen’s 87 passing yards came from YAC (54%). The average depth of Rosen’s passes was 9.22 air yards per throw.

Throwing into tight window was a futile effort. Rosen completed 1-of-7 contested throws for 7 yards. Pressure was a regular fixture, yet again, as Rosen was under duress on 11 drop backs (4 sacks, 5 hits, 2 hurries). The average time from snap-to-pressure was 2.30 seconds.

The war of attrition seems to have finally broken the Cardinals spirit. The team’s execution was lacking all year, but this game was something of a “white flag” effort from the coaching staff. Rosen gets tabbed with a losing performance for a lack of big-time plays, a few mistakes, and an awful holistic result.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 6 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 15 at Atlanta

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 15 at Atlanta –

We’ve reached the point in the season where the Cardinals coaching staff had to make a switch to prevent further damaging their 21-year-old quarterback. Josh Rosen, under duress all game, with very little help from the route concepts and plan to attack the Atlanta defense, was pulled for Mike Glennon in the fourth quarter.

The Falcons pass rush would’ve crippled the most grizzled veteran in the NFL; it completely debilitated Rosen. The Cardinal QB was under pressure 15-of-27 drop backs (6 sacks, 6 hits, 3 hurries) with an average snap-to-pressure time of 2.17 seconds.

Atlanta’s unrelenting pressure led to a season-low in average air yards per attempt (4.6 AYPT). The Arizona receivers picked up 82 yards after the catch counting for 62.1% of Rosen’s passing total.

Once again, a lopsided scoreboard forced Arizona into very little variety from a personnel grouping standpoint. Rosen was 4-of-5 with 37 yards on non-11-personnel calls. The issue there — Arizona was always in 11-personnell.

 

11-personnel 22 snaps
12-personnel 4 snaps
21-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen only committed two mistakes in the game (one accuracy, one a poor decision). The biggest mistake was an example of nervous antics in the pocket and a decision Rosen would prefer to have back (available in the Twitter thread).

Rosen was under-center just 5 times (gun 22), and only threw from play action three times; Rosen was 2-of-3 with 13 yards on play pass.

The Arizona offense converted only 18.5% (5-of-27) passing plays into first downs. Throwing into contested windows was a 50-50 proposition — Rosen threw for 68 yards on 4-of-8 passing into tight windows.

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 1/1 (100%)
11-19 yards 2/3 (66.7%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 12/15 (80%)

 

It was a miserable day for the Cardinals all the way around. Rosen never stood much of a chance to make a big time paly, or to make a game-changing mistake — but the one time he did make a crucial mistake, the game was already out of reach. This showing goes in the inconsequential column.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 5 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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