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Miami Dolphins

Mike Tannenbaum Reassigned; Chris Grier Promoted

Jason Hrina

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Image Credit: Associated Press

We’ve been speculating it for weeks (months? years?) now, but the Miami Dolphins have finally made a decision: Mike Tannenbaum has been reassigned within the organization and is no longer the Executive Vice President of Football Operations.

With the position now open, Chris Grier has been promoted from General Manager to Director of Football Operations.

A tumultuous tenure that started before his official hiring in February of 2015, Tannenbaum tried to build the exciting franchise Stephen Ross always wanted when he rolled out the orange carpet. Instead, we’re stuck in neutral.

We all saw what was coming prior to the 2015 hiring. Ross was consulting with all of his various football peers on the state of his team. Miraculously, all of these ‘has-beens’ that he consults seem to not hold any roles in the NFL, yet, Ross wonders why the team is still mediocre. It’s not the lone fault of the head coach or the general manager (or in this case, the executive VP), but it all trickles up to one person who can be blamed for this fiasco, and that’s Stephen Ross.

He can maneuver his pawns however he likes, but the business mogul is no mastermind in the football industry. Outmatched beyond anything money can buy, Ross needs to understand that HE is the one doing things wrong, not his underlings below him.

In a vacuum, Adam Gase, Chris Grier and Mike Tannenbaum could have worked as a trio, but Grier has been here since 2000, Tannenbaum effectively here since 2014, and Adam Gase was the last to arrive in January, 2016. While they’ll all say they cohesively work together, it’s tough to form a unified plan when each entity is interviewing years apart from each other (meaning, I’m sure Tannenbaum went into Ross’ office with a “plan” to sell the owner on why he should be the Executive VP/GM. Same for Adam Gase as well as Chris Grier when he wanted a promotion. None of these plans could have possibly matched years apart).

Tannenbaum’s history with the New York Jets told us he was going to be wild and bold.

Known to make a splashy move and create headlines, Tannenbaum’s first order of business was to sign Ndamukong Suh to the largest defensive contract in the history of the NFL at the time of his signing (6-years, $114m, $60m guaranteed).

His orchestration of back-to-Back AFC Championship teams seems to have been forgotten due to the comedy Mark Sanchez provided the league. Tannenbaum surprised everyone when he traded up to obtain the 5th overall pick in the 2009 draft which he used to select Sanchez. That was the only component holding him back from a potential Super Bowl (thank god).

Coincidentally enough, a quarterback would also be Tannenbaum’s undoing in Miami, except this time, he didn’t get a chance to make a drastic change. His patience (or his trust in his head coach’s patience) failed him; though it may be a good thing, because if retained, you get the feeling Tannenbaum would montage anything to get his quarterback and save his job.

Below is a short list of good and bad moves Tannenbaum made during his Dolphins tenure:

Tannenbaum’s good moves:

  • Trading for Andre Branch
  • Trading 5 draft spots to get Kiko Alonso and Byron Maxwell (2016 playoffs don’t happen without them)
  • Taking the (PR) hit on Laremy Tunsil (pun intended)
  • Signing Isa Abdul-Quddus (you forgot about him, didn’t you)
  • Trading for William Hayes
  • Trading for Daniel Kilgore
  • Trading Dannell Ellerbe and a 3rd-round pick for Kenny Stills

Tannenbaum’s bad moves:

  • Signing Ndamukong Suh to a large contract that required the team to annually maneuver money around to fit Suh on the team. They cut their losses short prior to this season, but it wasn’t without a hefty hit to their salary cap space in 2018 and 2019. Suh is set to cost more salary cap space than 95% (and possibly 100%) of the team.
  • Trading for Robert Quinn and absorbing that salary cap hit
  • Extending Branch and Alonso for such a high amount
  • Ryan Tannehill’s recent extension (which put us in this current “26.6 salary cap vs 19m dead cap” hell we’re in right now with the QB)
  • T.J. McDonald‘s early, expensive & unnecessary extension
  • Anything to do with Koa Misi
  • Letting Olivier Vernon and Lamar Miller leave (because you failed to sign them early and they blossomed out of your market)

Chris Grier’s promotion is interesting. With the Dolphins since 2000, Grier has had a substantial say in who the Dolphins have drafted this century. And without getting into all of the details, it’s easy to see that the Dolphins haven’t had successful drafts since he’s arrived.

How much of those decisions are his versus the general manager or head coach will never be known, but the long-respected scout continues to survive coaching change after coaching change in Miami – there must be a reason he’s so valuable.

Grier will be responsible for selecting Miami’s next General Manager.

In case you missed it, Adam Gase was also fired as the head coach of the Dolphins. Check out the latest on that departure here.

Growing up a passionate Dolphins fan in Jets territory, Jason learned from an early age that life as a Dolphins fan wasn’t going to be easy. Previously the Sports Editor for his university newspaper, Jason has experience writing columns, creating game recaps and conducting interviews with Hall of Fame athletes (Harry Carson and Yogi Berra are two of his proudest interviews). When he’s not dissecting the latest sports news, you can find him perplexed over the Dolphins offensive line woes or involuntarily introducing music to his neighbors.

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2 Comments

2 Comments

  1. Avatar

    RKD

    December 31, 2018 at 11:23 am

    Ross? You just don’t get it? They all had to go to bring back the real fans of Miami! So long Ross and Miami! It hasn’t been fun and it looks to get worse!

  2. Avatar

    pacificfinfan1

    February 3, 2019 at 5:16 pm

    For me why wasn’t Tannenbaum fired he was worse than Gase. Reassigned to where exactly?

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 17 at Seattle

Travis Wingfield

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Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

Week 17 at Seattle –

By the time this season finale came to an end the entire Cardinals operation had to breathe a sigh of relief. A disaster season, that came to a crashing conclusion, was finally in the rearview. For Josh Rosen, the last month of the season was a recurring nightmare. Rosen threw 146 passes in December and the only one that crossed pay dirt was a busted coverage in this Seattle game.

Some of Rosen’s strong suits didn’t travel to the Pacific Northwest. Throwing into contested windows, play-action passing, and third down conversions each brought back less than satisfactory returns.

The Cardinal passing offense converted 3-of-14 3rd downs. Rosen was 2-of-14 for 23 yards on contested throws and 5-of-10 for 56 yards on play pass.

Rosen was chucking-and-praying once again. The average air yards per throw tallied 10.8 yards, while the Arizona receivers only amassed 51 yards after the catch (34.2% of Rosen’s passing total).

The short passing game was far more fruitful than the vertical attacks.

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

The game was littered with mistakes from the Cardinals QB. Rosen registered 14 mistakes (11 from accuracy, 2 ball security issues, and 1 poor read). Rosen lost two fumbles and had two would-be interceptions dropped by the Seattle defense.

The personnel deployment featured more versatility than recent weeks. Rosen’s passes were supplemented by the following personnel packages.

 

11-personnel 31 snaps
12-personnel 3 snaps
21-personnel 4 snaps

 

As has been the case all season, Rosen was under frequent pressure. Seattle arrived for 11 pressures (6 sacks, 3 hits, 2 hurries) at an average time from snap-to-pressure of 2.19 seconds.

The busted coverage touchdown was Rosen’s one red-zone completion (1-of-3). He was in the gun for 25 snaps and under-center for 13.

Another week, another low conversion rate. The Cardinal passing game converted 8-of-38 plays into first downs (21.1%)

It’s difficult to imagine a more trying rookie season than the one Rosen experienced. The offensive line play was poor, the only consistent pass catcher was Larry Fitzgerald, and Rosen had his own share of rookie mistakes to compound things.

This game goes into the losing performance category marking eight consecutive games that Rosen failed to reach the winning performance category.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 7 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR, @SEA)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 16 vs. LA Rams

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 16 vs. LA Rams –

For the second consecutive game Josh Rosen didn’t finish under-center for the Cardinals. In a blowout loss, where it seemed like the entire game plan revolved around making life easy on Josh Rosen, Arizona still managed to get ran out of the building. Mike Glennon completed the final series for the Red Birds offense.

Rosen threw the ball only 23 times, but scrambled more than he has all season. The game plan also featured the least amount of variety, from a personnel grouping standpoint, all season.

 

11-personnel 30 snaps
12-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen’s typical third down heroics didn’t show up. The Cardinals converted only 2-of-10 third downs in the passing game (one a QB scramble). Converting, as it has been all season, was a challenge in general — Arizona converted just 6-of-31 drop backs (19.4%).

Rosen was in the shotgun almost exclusively (3 under-center, 28 in the gun). This led to a limited play-action passing game (only one throw from play pass).

The four mistakes attributed to Rosen were largely deep shots. He missed on short pass, but two of the three inaccuracies came on balls down the field. One of those deep shots was an ill-advised throw into coverage despite a wide open Larry Fitzgerald coming across the formation (seen in the video thread).

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

More than half of Rosen’s 87 passing yards came from YAC (54%). The average depth of Rosen’s passes was 9.22 air yards per throw.

Throwing into tight window was a futile effort. Rosen completed 1-of-7 contested throws for 7 yards. Pressure was a regular fixture, yet again, as Rosen was under duress on 11 drop backs (4 sacks, 5 hits, 2 hurries). The average time from snap-to-pressure was 2.30 seconds.

The war of attrition seems to have finally broken the Cardinals spirit. The team’s execution was lacking all year, but this game was something of a “white flag” effort from the coaching staff. Rosen gets tabbed with a losing performance for a lack of big-time plays, a few mistakes, and an awful holistic result.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 6 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 15 at Atlanta

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 15 at Atlanta –

We’ve reached the point in the season where the Cardinals coaching staff had to make a switch to prevent further damaging their 21-year-old quarterback. Josh Rosen, under duress all game, with very little help from the route concepts and plan to attack the Atlanta defense, was pulled for Mike Glennon in the fourth quarter.

The Falcons pass rush would’ve crippled the most grizzled veteran in the NFL; it completely debilitated Rosen. The Cardinal QB was under pressure 15-of-27 drop backs (6 sacks, 6 hits, 3 hurries) with an average snap-to-pressure time of 2.17 seconds.

Atlanta’s unrelenting pressure led to a season-low in average air yards per attempt (4.6 AYPT). The Arizona receivers picked up 82 yards after the catch counting for 62.1% of Rosen’s passing total.

Once again, a lopsided scoreboard forced Arizona into very little variety from a personnel grouping standpoint. Rosen was 4-of-5 with 37 yards on non-11-personnel calls. The issue there — Arizona was always in 11-personnell.

 

11-personnel 22 snaps
12-personnel 4 snaps
21-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen only committed two mistakes in the game (one accuracy, one a poor decision). The biggest mistake was an example of nervous antics in the pocket and a decision Rosen would prefer to have back (available in the Twitter thread).

Rosen was under-center just 5 times (gun 22), and only threw from play action three times; Rosen was 2-of-3 with 13 yards on play pass.

The Arizona offense converted only 18.5% (5-of-27) passing plays into first downs. Throwing into contested windows was a 50-50 proposition — Rosen threw for 68 yards on 4-of-8 passing into tight windows.

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 1/1 (100%)
11-19 yards 2/3 (66.7%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 12/15 (80%)

 

It was a miserable day for the Cardinals all the way around. Rosen never stood much of a chance to make a big time paly, or to make a game-changing mistake — but the one time he did make a crucial mistake, the game was already out of reach. This showing goes in the inconsequential column.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 5 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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