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Miami Dolphins

Minor League Miami Dolphins

Jason Hrina

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Image Credit: Gary A. Vasquez-USA TODAY Sports

The Miami Dolphins truly are a pathetic organization. This isn’t about Ja’Wuan James “worth” and if he was paid more than his value dictates. That aspect can be debated thoroughly; but when you finally do come to a conclusion, you realize he wasn’t one of those players that was absurdly “overpaid”.

Regardless, what’s the point of drafting talented players if you aren’t going to retain them?

Do any of you have any hope that your Miami Dolphins are going to re-sign Laremy Tunsil or Xavien Howard? And if you do believe Miami isn’t that stupid and they will actually re-sign them, do you think they’re going to get it right?

There’s a common theme with the Dolphins. They have the ability to identify talent in the draft, but they refrain from trusting their judgement enough to pay them “early”. As if paying someone for their current accomplishments and future performance is too risky for them.

There’s also one common theme with the organization throughout that time. You can say it’s Stephen Ross (though he wasn’t around when Bill Parcells took Jake Long #1 overall), but no, that person is Chris Grier.

I’m not sure what his actual role was this entire time, but it seems to be uncovering “acorns” in the draft and then allowing them to walk away. Did he not have a say in the players he scouted? Did he believe players like Andre Branch and Kiko Alonso were worth more money than Jarvis Landry?

What exactly did we get ourselves into by promoting Chris Grier? Which successful decisions can we attribute towards him and which mistakes can we blame on Mike Tannenbaum or Joe Philbin?

Here are the draft picks Miami has offered extensions to since Stephen Ross became 95% owner of the Miami Dolphins in 2009:

Note: this doesn’t include players who have received a 5th-year option; these are players that have received a brand new, multi-year extension from the Dolphins

  • Brian Hartline
  • Koa Misi
  • Reshad Jones
  • Mike Pouncey
  • Ryan Tannehill
  • Walt Aikens
  • Bobby McCain

Here is a (long yet incomplete) list of draft picks that have gotten away since Stephen Ross took over:

  • Jake Long
  • Kendall Langford
  • Vontae Davis
  • Sean Smith
  • Jared Odrick
  • Nolan Carroll
  • Charles Clay
  • Olivier Vernon
  • Lamar Miller
  • Rishard Matthews
  • Dion Jordan
  • Jamar Taylor
  • Dion Sims
  • Mike Gillislee
  • Caleb Sturgis
  • Jelani Jenkins
  • Ja’Wuan James
  • Jarvis Landry
  • Jay Ajayi

This list doesn’t include (every) draft “bust” like Jordan Phillips or DeVante Parker. Nor does it include undrafted free agents (like Cameron Wake), but even if we did, it’s fairly obvious which list is more alarming that the other.

We can blame Bill Parcells, we can blame Jeff Ireland, and we can blame Mike Tannenbaum, but there’s one underlying constant and that’s the current GM of this football team.

Now that he has his opportunity, we watch a franchise right tackle walk away, even though he could have been retained a year or two ago for a price you actually would have wanted.

We might watch a cornerback get traded or walk away next season because Miami is too scared to pay him one year “too early”.

It’s possible we watch the best emerging left tackle in the game walk away in two years because his price skyrockets far above anything the team expected.

Look at all of the “stupid money” floating around in free agency this offseason.

  • Trey Flowers for over $80m
  • C.J. Mosley for $85m
  • Landon Collins for $84m
  • Nick Foles for $88m!
  • Tyrann Mathieu for $42m
  • Justin Coleman for $36m
  • Jamison Crowder for $28.5m

Now look at what Trent Brown – a converted offensive guard that had one successful season at left tackle – made with the Oakland Raiders: 4-yr, $66m ($36.75m guaranteed).

If you say “who” to anyone on this list, it only further exasperates the point. Other than Flowers, Mosley and Collins, who are all very good players, the rest of the free agents are nowhere near the caliber of player Laremy Tunsil or Xavien Howard are.

If you think Laremy Tunsil is going to sign for anything close to what Brown just made you are most certainly mistaken. Again, this isn’t about if the money is “stupid” or not, it’s taking into account the current market, mixed with the influx of available cash/cap, paired with an increasing cap each year – which means Laremy Tunsil is going to cost far more than any left tackle is making currently. Especially if you decide to wait two more years.

The Dolphins might be sacrificing current cap space if they sign these players early, but they’re saving themselves future cap space. Foresight….it’s a crazy concept.

The main reason the Dolphins can’t afford to spend early on their draft picks is because they’re always putting themselves in cap hell with the horrendous free agents they sign. Extending Reshad Jones, Mike Pouncey, Ryan Tannehill and signing players like Ndamukong Suh and Mike Wallace forces you to a tight cap space which means you can’t allocate extra money to players that actually deserve it.

So now that you can take all of the players the Dolphins have released and pit them against the current Dolphins roster and win, I’d say Chris Grier has a lot on his plate.

Is he going to let Tunsil, Howard and eventually players like Kenyan Drake and Minkah Fitzpatrick just walk away (or traded for pennies on the dollar)? Then you have a building case for why Grier shouldn’t be running this team, and why it’s probably more-likely that he’s a spy for the New England Patriots than a productive general manager for the Miami Dolphins. Maybe he can manage that 33rd NFL team he’s sending all of these draft “finds” to each offseason.

While we should all be cheering the fact that the Miami Dolphins haven’t unnecessarily splurged on players “just cause”, we have to wonder why it gets to the point where Miami either overpays or has to be honored for not overpaying.

Because seriously, this year’s free agency victory was “Miami didn’t do something stupid!”

How do we change that narrative? Is it with Chris Grier as the general manager? Right now, I’m not so sure about that one….

Growing up a passionate Dolphins fan in Jets territory, Jason learned from an early age that life as a Dolphins fan wasn’t going to be easy. Previously the Sports Editor for his university newspaper, Jason has experience writing columns, creating game recaps and conducting interviews with Hall of Fame athletes (Harry Carson and Yogi Berra are two of his proudest interviews). When he’s not dissecting the latest sports news, you can find him perplexed over the Dolphins offensive line woes or involuntarily introducing music to his neighbors.

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17 Comments

17 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Kevin Chapman

    March 12, 2019 at 9:12 am

    Keep it positive bro-seph.
    Hang in there, the climate change is in full swing!

    • Jason Hrina

      Jason Hrina

      March 12, 2019 at 1:03 pm

      That change is definitely coming, Kevin! Glad to see this team hold off on splurging for the FA. Now if only they begin to sign their own top players before they become too expensive. Fingers crossed that comes with the climate change as well

  2. Avatar

    Mojo

    March 12, 2019 at 10:04 am

    “Franchise Right Tackle”? Is there such a thing? If there is it certainly isn’t James. James is an average right tackle getting paid elite money. I’m overjoyed they let him walk at that price. He will be easily replaced. And we will get a compensatory pick in 2020.

    • Jason Hrina

      Jason Hrina

      March 12, 2019 at 1:08 pm

      Right tackle certainly isn’t on the same level as LT, CB, QB or even DEs, but James could have been your right tackle for an extended period of time.

      The compensatory pick will be very nice for Miami, that’s true. Just wish they took the risk and signed him earlier in his career rather than waiting until his value ballooned higher than his worth.

      Then again, hard to predict that when he was coming off of a year in which he played in only 8 games.

  3. Avatar

    Herb

    March 12, 2019 at 12:26 pm

    It’s fair to critique the Dolphins for how they handled their draft picks in recent years, but you can’t fault this individual decision based on where they were entering free agency. This was the smart move given where this team. (cough: they don’t have a QB if you think tannehill is getting cut.) I feel like somehow James has improved exponentially over the last few months, as there was not this kind of fire about his play at Week 17.

    • Jason Hrina

      Jason Hrina

      March 12, 2019 at 1:07 pm

      This FA period certainly hyped up James more than his play was warranting at season’s end. That said, I still believe he was a good RT for us. My biggest complaint with this move is that Miami had the ability to re-sign James going into 2018 and held back due to the uncertainty he provided (which, can’t deny, was there coming into 2018 with his injury history). If they would have taken the risk it’s possible they have James at a 4-yr/$36m deal ($9 per year) rather than paying the 5th-year option at around that price and now losing him to Denver. It will require additional assets (spending $ on lesser talent or using a draft pick) just to replace him.

      Wonder if Jesse Davis is their answer.

      Can’t fault them for letting James go on that contract, just wish they would have nabbed him a littler earlier.

  4. Avatar

    Ken Booker

    March 12, 2019 at 4:12 pm

    I know how you feel. Been a fin fan for over 46 years. They were the only sports team in Fl. I love my fins, but the team has been run badly since Shula was run out of town. But i could never turn my back on them. I pray to holy God that this team can turn it around before i friggin die.

    • Jason Hrina

      Jason Hrina

      March 13, 2019 at 1:55 pm

      It’s been some dark times – if only I was able to experience those prime Shula and/or Marino years. They will eventually turn it around, and it’ll feel very sweet when they do. Hopefully that comes sooner rather than later.

  5. Avatar

    Marchcool

    March 12, 2019 at 4:47 pm

    The Dolphins are indeed pathetic since S. Ross became the owner. All the miscues you mentioned on extending contracts are the fault of the stupid FO. They overpay millions to players like M. Wallace, but let go players like Landry, Vernon, Miller, etc etc.
    No hope that this team can regain the excellency that once enjoyed as far as this moronic and dilettante owner remains in the (dis)organization…sadly for us the faithful and all-time Dolphins fans.

    • Jason Hrina

      Jason Hrina

      March 13, 2019 at 1:59 pm

      Have to like that Ross is always willing to spend, but it took him awhile to acclimate to being an NFL owner (if he’s even there at all) and in that time the Front Office has built this team terribly. Have to just hope that they turn it around this time.

  6. Avatar

    Miamimanman

    March 12, 2019 at 4:59 pm

    While I totally understand your frustration with past FO’s letting some in house talent walk, I see this as Grier/Flores and Co. trying to bring a bit of the Patriot way down south via the compensatory draft pick model.

    If Miami hones in on some low tier free agents, and especially dudes who’ve been cut (since they won’t count against the comp. pick formula), we can net a 3rd and a 5th potentially. We’ll survive the loss of James, although it would have been nice if we signed him a year ago at a slight discount.

    I just messed around with Spotracs salary calculator for 2020, and with a bit of tinkering its not out of the realm of possibility that we can have over 100 mill in cap space by then as well. Plenty of funds to bring back X, Tunsil and even Drake if he excels this year.

    Now if Grier decides to let X walk, then I’ll be a pissed as well. If we hit on a second CB this draft we can have Surtain/Madison 2.0 (or 3.0 depending on if you count Smith and Vontae lol).

    • Jason Hrina

      Jason Hrina

      March 13, 2019 at 2:02 pm

      I agree and do believe that this team is setting their cap up nicely for 2020 (have a piece coming out on that in the future). Between Grier getting his own grip on the show and with the input of Flores and the rest of the Patriots staff (along with Jim Caldwell and other experienced coaches coming over), Miami may finally be building it right.

      Hopefully this regime learned from past mistakes and don’t let Tunsil or Howard out the door. Would absolutely love that shutdown tandem at corner (especially with Fitzpatrick back there as a safety or in the slot)

  7. Avatar

    Jhary

    March 12, 2019 at 5:02 pm

    So let me get this straight…PFF ranks James tied for 34th in the NFL…there’s only 32 teams in the league, which puts James in the bottom half of the league…and the Ponies just made him the highest paid RT in the league??? So in a contract year, James busts his butt to be the very best he could be, and average was the very best he could achieve…and that’s worth $13 mil a year??? Denver paid him TWICE what he was actually worth…and now that James got the big bucks, do you REALLY think he’s going to bust his butt to get any better??? If I was a gambling man, I’d wager good money Denver cuts him in 2 years when they realize just how much they over-paid his average at best butt.

    • Jason Hrina

      Jason Hrina

      March 13, 2019 at 2:07 pm

      There are a few things that irk me with James walking. Is he “overpaid”? Yes. That’s not the kind of money I want to pay James. But, if we are looking to build around a young quarterback this year or next year you’re going to want to protect him. By letting James go, you now have to spend $ on lesser talent or use a valuable draft pick on a replacement (or find a replacement lower in the draft, but Miami hasn’t been able to uncover that in the past – with Grier as director of college scouting or “general manager”).

      If Miami looked into extending him last year, coming off of a season in which he only played in 8 games, they could have had him for $8-$9m/year. It’s risky, of course, but it’s the kind of risks Miami takes and seems to get wrong (Hartline, Tannehill, Jones, etc).

      James may have been ranked 34th, but it’s something to take with a grain of salt. Todd Gurley is the 18th-ranked RB and I’d rather have him over anyone except Barkley, Zeke or maybe Chubb (contract plays a huge part). I do think James is a very good RT – good enough that he isn’t necessarily elite, but you don’t have to worry about him.

  8. Avatar

    PapaPickett

    March 12, 2019 at 10:26 pm

    This is a severe overeaction. I dont know why your acting like his performance was something that was worth what he was paid. Juwuan James is not an impact player. He is simply replaceable yet is now the highest paid RT in the NFL. His work in the run game was also atrocious every single year he was in the league.

    Alot of the players you mentioned that we let go made sense to let go of, but lets just focus on James. If we sign James to anything near what he was offered, he continues to be mediocre while costing top dollar, which restricts our ability to resign key difference makers like Howard and Tunsil.

    Your arguement goes against your own logic. James is not a great player. He was above average to average and will not see the end of his contract. See Olivier Vernon/Jarvis Landry. In the mean time we can pay real play makers.

    • Jason Hrina

      Jason Hrina

      March 13, 2019 at 2:14 pm

      Depends which playmakers we’re deciding to pay? We didn’t extend guys like Vernon or Landry early because we were too busy extended Branch or Kiko or reworking Tannehill or Suh’s contracts because we needed the cap space.

      It’s the poor overall cap management and the inability to retain/extend the right players is what gets me. Although James is not worth the money he received, he could have been retained for $8-9m/year if the team jumped on signing him early (coming off of a season in which he only played 8 games). Now, Miami needs to spend $ on lesser talent or spend draft picks on his replacement.

      As for others, it’s safe to say there are a bunch that didn’t/won’t “earn” the contracts they received; it’s just that Miami never finds a way to retain them. If you sign Olivier Vernon a year early you don’t extend Andre Branch, spend a 1st-round pick on Charles Harris, and then send a draft pick to eventually use the same amount of cap space on Robert Quinn….that’s the repercussions of letting good players walk.

      Miami replaced Jarvis Landry with Albert Wilson and they were only able to get 7 games from him and who knows if he’ll be the same player last year.

      Miami spent 2nd and 3rd round picks on Jamar Taylor and Will Davis to try and replace Vontae Davis and Sean Smith and they weren’t all that great. Then Miami sends Taylor to Cleveland and he becomes a viable starter (at worst, a really good depth player).

      Why does Miami constantly extend the wrong players?

  9. Avatar

    Mike

    March 13, 2019 at 9:31 pm

    The future is here! Can anyone say 3-13 or 3-12 for the next dozen or so years? A good season is going to be 7 or 8 wins. The Dolphins front office has made some big mistakes over the years, by not signing players early enough, spending too much on free agents and making just plain stupid mistakes. Top all of these moves off with the amazing incredible and completely moronic idea of signing a coach that has NEVER been a coordinator and guaranteeing his contract for 5 years! That is the ultimate in stupid decisions. And hiring a guy from the Cheatriots makes it even worse.

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 17 at Seattle

Travis Wingfield

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Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

Week 17 at Seattle –

By the time this season finale came to an end the entire Cardinals operation had to breathe a sigh of relief. A disaster season, that came to a crashing conclusion, was finally in the rearview. For Josh Rosen, the last month of the season was a recurring nightmare. Rosen threw 146 passes in December and the only one that crossed pay dirt was a busted coverage in this Seattle game.

Some of Rosen’s strong suits didn’t travel to the Pacific Northwest. Throwing into contested windows, play-action passing, and third down conversions each brought back less than satisfactory returns.

The Cardinal passing offense converted 3-of-14 3rd downs. Rosen was 2-of-14 for 23 yards on contested throws and 5-of-10 for 56 yards on play pass.

Rosen was chucking-and-praying once again. The average air yards per throw tallied 10.8 yards, while the Arizona receivers only amassed 51 yards after the catch (34.2% of Rosen’s passing total).

The short passing game was far more fruitful than the vertical attacks.

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

The game was littered with mistakes from the Cardinals QB. Rosen registered 14 mistakes (11 from accuracy, 2 ball security issues, and 1 poor read). Rosen lost two fumbles and had two would-be interceptions dropped by the Seattle defense.

The personnel deployment featured more versatility than recent weeks. Rosen’s passes were supplemented by the following personnel packages.

 

11-personnel 31 snaps
12-personnel 3 snaps
21-personnel 4 snaps

 

As has been the case all season, Rosen was under frequent pressure. Seattle arrived for 11 pressures (6 sacks, 3 hits, 2 hurries) at an average time from snap-to-pressure of 2.19 seconds.

The busted coverage touchdown was Rosen’s one red-zone completion (1-of-3). He was in the gun for 25 snaps and under-center for 13.

Another week, another low conversion rate. The Cardinal passing game converted 8-of-38 plays into first downs (21.1%)

It’s difficult to imagine a more trying rookie season than the one Rosen experienced. The offensive line play was poor, the only consistent pass catcher was Larry Fitzgerald, and Rosen had his own share of rookie mistakes to compound things.

This game goes into the losing performance category marking eight consecutive games that Rosen failed to reach the winning performance category.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 7 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR, @SEA)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 16 vs. LA Rams

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 16 vs. LA Rams –

For the second consecutive game Josh Rosen didn’t finish under-center for the Cardinals. In a blowout loss, where it seemed like the entire game plan revolved around making life easy on Josh Rosen, Arizona still managed to get ran out of the building. Mike Glennon completed the final series for the Red Birds offense.

Rosen threw the ball only 23 times, but scrambled more than he has all season. The game plan also featured the least amount of variety, from a personnel grouping standpoint, all season.

 

11-personnel 30 snaps
12-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen’s typical third down heroics didn’t show up. The Cardinals converted only 2-of-10 third downs in the passing game (one a QB scramble). Converting, as it has been all season, was a challenge in general — Arizona converted just 6-of-31 drop backs (19.4%).

Rosen was in the shotgun almost exclusively (3 under-center, 28 in the gun). This led to a limited play-action passing game (only one throw from play pass).

The four mistakes attributed to Rosen were largely deep shots. He missed on short pass, but two of the three inaccuracies came on balls down the field. One of those deep shots was an ill-advised throw into coverage despite a wide open Larry Fitzgerald coming across the formation (seen in the video thread).

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 0/3 (0%)
11-19 yards 0/3 (0%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 11/16 (68.8%)

 

More than half of Rosen’s 87 passing yards came from YAC (54%). The average depth of Rosen’s passes was 9.22 air yards per throw.

Throwing into tight window was a futile effort. Rosen completed 1-of-7 contested throws for 7 yards. Pressure was a regular fixture, yet again, as Rosen was under duress on 11 drop backs (4 sacks, 5 hits, 2 hurries). The average time from snap-to-pressure was 2.30 seconds.

The war of attrition seems to have finally broken the Cardinals spirit. The team’s execution was lacking all year, but this game was something of a “white flag” effort from the coaching staff. Rosen gets tabbed with a losing performance for a lack of big-time plays, a few mistakes, and an awful holistic result.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 6 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET, LAR)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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Miami Dolphins

Josh Rosen 2018 Passing Chart – Week 15 at Atlanta

Travis Wingfield

Published

on

Football, more so than any other sport, requires context to tell the full story. Box scores provide the casual fan with a general idea of the cumulative result of any given game, but without isolating each player’s performance, many details go unnoticed.

This project is entirely based around isolating the play of Josh Rosen. Traditional data points will tell you that his rookie season was one of the worst in the history of the league. Watching each drop back multiple times over, breaking down the most impactful plays, and charting the data that tells the true story, this is the 2018 Josh Rosen charting project.

Jump To:

Week 4 vs. Seattle
Week 5 at San Francisco
Week 6 at Minnesota
Week 7 vs. Denver
Week 8 vs. San Francisco
Week 10 at Kansas City
Week 11 vs. Oakland
Week 12 at LA Chargers
Week 13 at Green Bay
Week 14 vs. Detroit
Week 15 at Atlanta
Week 16 vs. LA Rams
Week 17 at Seattle

 

Week 15 at Atlanta –

We’ve reached the point in the season where the Cardinals coaching staff had to make a switch to prevent further damaging their 21-year-old quarterback. Josh Rosen, under duress all game, with very little help from the route concepts and plan to attack the Atlanta defense, was pulled for Mike Glennon in the fourth quarter.

The Falcons pass rush would’ve crippled the most grizzled veteran in the NFL; it completely debilitated Rosen. The Cardinal QB was under pressure 15-of-27 drop backs (6 sacks, 6 hits, 3 hurries) with an average snap-to-pressure time of 2.17 seconds.

Atlanta’s unrelenting pressure led to a season-low in average air yards per attempt (4.6 AYPT). The Arizona receivers picked up 82 yards after the catch counting for 62.1% of Rosen’s passing total.

Once again, a lopsided scoreboard forced Arizona into very little variety from a personnel grouping standpoint. Rosen was 4-of-5 with 37 yards on non-11-personnel calls. The issue there — Arizona was always in 11-personnell.

 

11-personnel 22 snaps
12-personnel 4 snaps
21-personnel 1 snap

 

Rosen only committed two mistakes in the game (one accuracy, one a poor decision). The biggest mistake was an example of nervous antics in the pocket and a decision Rosen would prefer to have back (available in the Twitter thread).

Rosen was under-center just 5 times (gun 22), and only threw from play action three times; Rosen was 2-of-3 with 13 yards on play pass.

The Arizona offense converted only 18.5% (5-of-27) passing plays into first downs. Throwing into contested windows was a 50-50 proposition — Rosen threw for 68 yards on 4-of-8 passing into tight windows.

Rosen’s depth splits were as follows:

 

Portion of the Field Accurate Pass/Number of Passes
20+ yards 1/1 (100%)
11-19 yards 2/3 (66.7%)
0-10 yards (or behind LOS) 12/15 (80%)

 

It was a miserable day for the Cardinals all the way around. Rosen never stood much of a chance to make a big time paly, or to make a game-changing mistake — but the one time he did make a crucial mistake, the game was already out of reach. This showing goes in the inconsequential column.

 

2018 Performance Results Number of Games
Winning Performance 2 (SEA, SF)
Inconsequential Performance 3 (@MIN, @LAC, @ATL)
Losing Performance 5 (@SF, DEN, @KC, OAK, @GB, DET)

Winning Performance – The QB played well enough to garner a victory. He limited mistakes and made plays in crucial situations.
Inconsequential Performance – More of a game-managing role, the QB didn’t have the big plays, but mistakes were limited.
Losing Performance – The QB limited his team’s ability to win the game with his performance.

@WingfieldNFL

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